Dyslexia and Due Process

Mar 14, 2018 by

Dyslexia Task Force Bill Gets Senate Hearing

The Senate Education Committee held a hearing today on Sub for HB 2602, a bill establishing a Task Force to study issues around the handling of dyslexia in schools and make recommendations to the legislature. Dyslexia has become a perennial issue in the education committees.

A number of parents of students with dyslexia testified in favor of the bill as did the Disability Rights Center and KNEA.

In remarks to the Committee, KNEA lobbyist Mark Desetti noted that this task force, like most legislatively established education task forces, has no teachers. “Those working directly with our children have no voice on the task force,” said Desestti. “There is a belief, apparently, that teachers are waiting for groups of legislators, administrators, and parents to tell them how to do the job for which they are trained and licensed.”

Desetti also noted that one parent told the committee that her child’s second-grade teacher told her in a conference that perhaps her child was dyslexic and should be evaluated. This led to a diagnosis by a medical professional and much-needed support for her child. But another parent said that when she asked a teacher if her child might be dyslexic, the teacher told her, “We are not allowed to mention the ‘D’ word!”

“Both are true,” said Desetti. I have heard that some school administrators or boards of education have directed teachers not to suggest dyslexia as a possible explanation for a child’s reading difficulties. I also know that those classroom teachers are the  best advocates for a child after the child’s own parents.”

Here, one teacher advocated for her student with the parent. The other teacher admitted she was directed not to advocate if such advocacy included the word “dyslexia.” Kansas, Desetti noted, is one of only two states in the nation that provides absolutely no job security protection or due process for teachers. Teachers want to fight for their students but what happens to a teacher – an at-will employee – who breaks with an administration that told her not to mention dyslexia?

We want teachers who stand up for the best programs and support for every child. If our teachers had due process it would provide the platform for them to be strong advocates. We’re still looking for the Senate to take up the issue.

We Must Let Those Reps Who Voted YES on Due Process Know How Much We Appreciate Their Support

73 members of the Kansas House of Representatives voted to restore due process rights to Kansas teachers, sending the bill over to the Senate where it awaits a hearing now.

Recent news has revealed that while Kansas teachers are 42nd in the nation in teacher salaries, they are dead last in pay when compared to private sector workers in their own state. For every dollar earned in the private sector in Kansas, a Kansas teacher earns 71 cents. On top of that, the retirement system for new Kansas teachers is significantly worse than that provided in our neighboring states. And then, to add insult to injury, the Kansas Legislative Research Department reported that Kansas is one of only two states in the nation that have no job security measures – such as due process – for teachers. These are three big reasons why Kansas is struggling to find teachers to staff our classrooms and why young Kansans are choosing alternative occupations.

So we should be thanking those legislators who are trying to turn this around every chance we get.

If your Representative is one of the 73, you can click here to find a thank you note to post on your social media feeds – Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, any and all channels.