It’s Turnaround! What’s gone? What’s Where?

Mar 2, 2015 by

KNEA has been following, testifying on, and reporting here on a number of bills in the first half of the session. While generally speaking, if a bill has not passed its chamber of origin by Turnaround, it is considered dead for the year. There are some exceptions to this however.

Bills that were introduced in or referred to the House and Senate Federal and State Affairs, Senate Ways and Means, Senate Assessment and Taxation, House committees on Calendar and Printing, Appropriations, or Taxation are exempt from timelines. A common practice at Turnaround is “blessing” a bill. A bill that is in a non-exempt committee and has not been acted upon can be referred to an exempt committee and so kept alive into the second half of the session.

Here then is the status of a number of bills we have been tracking.

House Bills:

HB 2139, repealing in-state tuition for the children of undocumented aliens. KNEA opposes this bill. It still awaits action in the House.

HB 2034, Dave Trabert’s “minority report” bill changing collective bargaining. KNEA opposes this bill. It has been killed.

HB 2199, mandating opt-in for human sexuality education. KNEA opposes this bill. It awaits action in the House.

HB 2292, repealing the Kansas College and Career Ready Standards, Next Generation Science Standards, ending use of AP and International Baccalaureate programs. KNEA opposes this bill. It awaits action in the House.

HB 2257, the education community consensus collective bargaining bill. KNEA supports this bill. It was amended into HB 2326.

HB 2236, the bill ending exclusive bargaining rights. KNEA opposed this bill as introduced. It now contains the education community’s consensus collective bargaining bill. It passed the full House and now goes to the Senate. KNEA now supports the bill.

HB 2220, restoring teacher due process. KNEA supports this bill. It awaits action in the House.

HB 2031, school district plans addressing child sexual abuse. KNEA supports this bill. It awaits action in the House.

HB 2232, personal financial literacy course as a graduation requirement. KNEA opposes this bill. It awaits action in the House.

HB 2234, prohibiting post-secondary institution employees from using their titles when writing in the newspaper. KNEA opposes this bill. It awaits action in the House.

HB 2028, creating a legislative committee to write education standards. KNEA opposes this bill. It awaits action in the House.

Senate Bills:

SB 2, authorizing school districts to offer multi-year contracts to teachers. KNEA is neutral on this bill. It awaits action in the Senate.

SB 60, participation by homeschool and private school students in KSHSAA activities. KNEA opposed this bill as introduced. It was significantly amended and has been passed by the Senate. The bill is now in the House. KNEA is neutral on the bill as amended.

SB 70, background checks and fingerprinting of teachers every five years. KNEA opposes this bill. It has passed the Senate and is now in the House.

SB 71, changing the LOB calculation creating a cut in supplemental general state aid in the current year. KNEA opposes this bill. It awaits action in the Senate.

SB 56, Removing the affirmative defense from K-12 public, private, or parochial school teachers. KNEA opposes this bill. It has passed the Senate and is now in the House.

SB 67, Common Core repeal (see HB 2292). KNEA opposes this bill. It awaits action in the Senate.

SB 212, prohibiting the use of payroll deduction for dues collection. KNEA opposes this bill. It awaits action in the Senate.

SB 179, modifying the Public Employer Employee Relations Act (PEERA) limiting negotiations and eliminating the Public Employees Relations Board. KNEA opposes this bill. It awaits action in the Senate.

For information on other bills we’ve been tracking this session, click on the “Bill Quick Look” link to the right.

For information on the status of collective bargaining, see our post below.

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PNA hearing moved; three bills heard in House Ed

Feb 18, 2015 by

Senate Hearing on PNA Cancelled; Moved to Monday

The Senate Education Committee was cancelled today and the hearing on SB 176, the bill that restricts bargaining to minimum salaries and ends mediation and fact-finding. This bill is opposed by KNEA, KASB, USA/KS and KSSA.

The four education organizations representing teachers, administrators, school boards, and superintendents have introduced their own bill that would amend the Professional Negotiations Act to make collective bargaining more effective, more efficient, and more focused. That bill, SB 136, had a hearing in the Senate Education Committee but has not been debated or voted on.

The hearing on the bad bill, SB 176, has been rescheduled for Monday afternoon, Feb. 23.

Please take the time to contact members of the Senate Education Committee and urge them to reject SB 176 and instead pass SB 136, that bill that everyone in the education community would like to see adopted.

You can contact the members of the Senate Education Committee on this issue by clicking on their names below:

Sen. Steve Abrams

Sen. Tom Arpke

Sen. Anthony Hensley

Sen. Vicki Schmidt

Sen. Dan Kerschen

Sen. Pat Pettey

Sen. Molly Baumgardner

Sen. Dennis Pyle

Sen. Jeff Melcher

Sen. Caryn Tyson

Sen. Steve Fitzgerald

 


House Committee Considers Three Bills

The House Education Committee today held hearings on three bills today.

First up was HB 2234 which would prohibit post-secondary employees (tech colleges, community colleges, and four-year universities) from using their titles when writing columns in newspapers. Two representatives testified in favor of the bill while KNEA testified in opposition.

The legislators did not like the fact that professors were writing columns critical of legislators and the legislature. The bill would stop professors from using titles when writing opinion pieces that are about candidates, legislators, or issues before the legislature. Speculation under the dome is that the bill is targeted to a group of professors writing as a group under the name “Insight Kansas.”

KNEA argued that the bill was a “slippery slope.” It might start with professors but would there be a desire later to prohibit superintendents from writing editorials critical of the impact of the Governor’s K-12 allotments? What about legislators writing opinion piece in support of his/her position on a tax bill?

Further, the Board of Regents already has a policy in place to protect their integrity and it is up to the Board and the individual institutions to enforce it.

Also up today was HB 2174 which makes technical amendments to the tuition tax credit bill and HB 2203 which encourages school districts to consolidate administrative services. There are many concerns about how HB 2203 would work and whether or not in might ultimately force some administrative consolidation.

No action was taken on any of the bills today.

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